Nathaniel Rindlaub

Software Developer
Technology
[email protected]

Nathaniel is a software developer for the Nature Conservancy’s California Chapter, specializing in data visualization and map-based applications. Through thoughtful design and development, Nathaniel makes complex datasets more accessible, explorable, and actionable to both internal staff and external stakeholders. He believes that technology, design, and storytelling are powerful tools for elevating The Nature Conservancy’s science products and increasing their impact. 

Prior to joining the Conservancy, Nathaniel worked at a software startup in Portland, Maine, and he holds a degree in Environmental Economics from New York University.

What Nathaniel is working on now:

Nathaniel is currently working on a number web applications that facilitate the exploration of datasets derived from remote sensing and machine learning technologies.


Select products

2019 | Freshwater | Technology | Science | Maps & Webmaps

GDE Pulse: Monitoring Groundwater Dependent Ecosystems with Satellites

Kirk Klausmeyer, Falk Schuetzenmeister, Nathaniel Rindlaub, Tanushree Biswas, Melissa M. Rohde, Jeanette Howard

94,333 unique ecosystems depend on groundwater in California. GDE Pulse lets you see how they have changed over the last 30 years.  Groundwater managers and environmental stakeholders often lack information about the health of critical groundwater dependent ecosystems (GDEs). To fill this information gap, we…


2019 | Terrestrial | Planning | Technology | Science | Maps & Webmaps

Planning for connectivity implementation in present-day California and for a changing future: a 3-D web-tour

Carrie Schloss, Dick Cameron, Nathaniel Rindlaub, Connor Shank

This interactive, web-based tour provides an accessible introduction to The Nature Conservancy’s analysis of wildlife movement routes for climate adaptation in California. Viewing these pathways in three-dimensional landscapes highlights the importance of elevation gradients, stream and river valleys, and topographic relief for species moving in…


2017 | Freshwater | Science | Data

California Natural Flows Database

Julie K.H. Zimmerman, Daren M. Carlisle, Jason T. May, Kirk R. Klausmeyer, Theodore E. Grantham, Larry R. Brown, Jeanette K. Howard, Nathaniel Rindlaub

The Nature Conservancy and the United Stated Geological Survey (USGS) partnered to generate estimates of natural flows (expected streamflow in the absence of human modification) in all the streams and rivers in California (1950-2015). For more details on the methods and results see  Patterns and…